Census of India 2011


Facts of Socio-Economic Census 2011:-
♦ There are 24.39 crore households in the country, of which 17.91 crore live in villages.
♦ 10.69 Crore households are considered as deprived.
♦ The average size of a rural Indian household is nearly five members (4.93).
♦ The highest being in Uttar Pradesh at 6.26 and the lowest in Andhra Pradesh at 3.86.
♦ Over two out of every three rural households own a mobile phone.
♦ Nearly 28 per cent rural households are without any phone.
♦ In Chhattisgarh, this is particularly high at 71 per cent, mainly due to lack of connectivity and mobile towers.
♦ 36 per cent of rural Indians are illiterate.
♦ 23.52 per cent rural families have no literate adult above 25 years
♦ The proportion of those passing through the primary, secondary, senior secondary and higher secondary stages drops at each successive level, from nearly 18 per cent to 5 per cent, while only 3.45 per cent are graduates or above.
♦ The highest proportion for graduates is in the National Capital Territory and Delhi, at 9.6 per cent; among the states, Kerala tops at 8 per cent.
♦ Only 10 per cent households have someone with a salaried job, the majority are in government jobs.
♦ Only 8 per cent households earn Rs 10,000 or more every month.
♦ As for sources of income, 9.16 crore households (51.14%) depend on manual casual labour followed by cultivation (30.10%).
♦ 2.5 Crore (14.01%) rural families are dependent on income from other sources which include government service, private sector and PSUs.
♦ 5.37 Crore (29.97%) households in rural areas are landless deriving a major part of their income from manual labour.
♦ 4.08 Lakh households fall back on ragpicking while 6.68 lakh depend on begging and charity alms.
♦ Only 4.6 per cent of all rural households in the country pay income tax.
♦ 21.53 per cent (3.86 Crore) families living in villages belong to SC/ST categories.
♦ The percentage of Scheduled Caste households paying income tax was 3.49 per cent while Scheduled Tribe tax-paying rural households were mere 3.34 per cent
♦ Majority of households is male-headed, but nearly 13 per cent do have a female head.
♦ In Rajasthan, around 91 per cent households in rural areas are headed by men, while in Kerala 26 per cent households are women-headed, the highest among the states.
♦ 2.37 Crore (13.25%) families in villages live in houses of one room with kaccha walls and roof.
♦ Divorces are a relatively common phenomenon in urban India, they remain almost rare in the rural landscape.
♦ Only 0.12 per cent of the rural population has been divorced, the highest in Mizoram at 1.08 percent.
♦ 41.64 per cent rural people as never married (the highest being in Nagaland at 56 per cent).
♦ 0.09 per cent of rural households are houseless, compared to 0.15 per cent in the urban areas.
The census, carried out in 640 districts under the aegis of the Rural Development Ministry. This is the first Census released after 1932 and contains various details with regard to specific regions, communities, caste and economic groups and measures the progress of the households in India.
SECC data would have meaningful use in housing for all, education and skills thrust, MGNREGA, the National Food Security Act, interventions for differently-abled, interventions for women-led households, and targeting of households/individual entitlements on evidence of deprivation.
Can you solve this Quiz?
1. % of rural Indians are illiterate.
a)36
b)59
c)64
d)20
2.% of families living in villages belong to SC/ST categories.
a) 11.53 per cent
b) 21.53 per cent
c) 14.21 per cent
d) 25.24 per cent
3. % of all rural households in the country pay income tax.
a) 1.5
b) 10
c) 4.6
d) 6
4. Households with salaried income are close to —–who pay income tax
a) 1%
b) 5%
c) 6%
d) 10%
5.This is the first Census released after ——- that contains various details with regard to specific regions, communities, caste and economic groups and measures the progress of the households in India.
a) 1932
b) 1950
c) 1999
d) 1942
Population facts about India
General Points
1.As per provisional data of Census 2011, India’s
population stood at 1,21,01,93,422.
2.The census moment, the referral time at which
the snapshot of the population is taken was 00.00 hours of 1 March 2001. Until
the 1991 Census, the sunrise of 1 March was taken to be the census moment.
3.India’s population as on 1 March 2001 stood at 1,028
million (532.1 million males and 496.4 million females).
4.India’s population grew by 18,14,55,986 (17.64%) at
the rate of 1.64% per annum in the decade 2001-11.
5.India accounts for a meagre 2.4 per cent of the
world surface area of 135.79 million sq km. Yet, it supports and sustains
a whopping 17.5 per cent of the world population.
India in relation to other countries
1)
The growth in India’s population during the decade 2001-11 is
slightly lower than the population of Brazil, the fifth most populated
country in the world.
2)
China’s decadal growth is 0.53% against India’s 1.64%. At
the present rates India is
likely to overtake China
as the most populous country of world by 2030.
3)
Three most
populous countries of the world viz. China
(1.34 billion), India (1.21
billion) and USA
(308.7 million) account for 40% population of the world.
4)
The population
of India is almost equal to
the combined population of U.S.A.,
Indonesia, Brazil, Pakistan,
Bangladesh and Japan.
Population Growth – 1901-2011
1.The population of India in 1901 was 23,83,96,327.
It increased more than four times by 2011.
2.The population of India in grew by just one and
half times in the first half of twentieth century, while it recorded a
three fold growth in the latter half of the century.
3.The population of India saw a negative growth
during 1911-1921 when its population decreased from 25,20,93,390 to 25,13,21,213.
4.The population of India in 1951, just four years
after independence was 36,10,88,090.
Indian States and Union
Territories
1.Among the Indian states, Uttar Pradesh is the
most populated state with a population of 19,95,81,477 and Sikkim is
the least populated state with a population of 6,07,688.
2.The second, third, fourth and fifth ranked
states are Maharashtra (11,23,72,972), Bihar (10,38,04,637), West Bengal (9,13,47,736)
and Andhra Pradesh (8,46,65,533) respectively.
3.Among the Union
Territories, Delhi is the most populated UT with a
population of 1,67,53,235 and Lakshdweep is the least populated UT with a
population of 64,429.
4.The population of Delhi
is greater than Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal
Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya,
Nagaland, Tripura, Mizoram and Manipur
5.The second most populated UT is Puducherry
with a population of 12,44,464 followed by Chandigarh with a population of 10,54,686.
Density of Population
1.The population density of India is 382
persons per square kilometre while it was 325 persons in 2001.
2.India had a population density of just 77 persons
per sq. km in 1901.
3.The state with highest density of population
is Bihar with a population of 1102
persons per square kilometre.
4.The state with lowest density of population is
Arunachal Pradesh with a population of 17 persons per square kilometre.
5.The UT with highest density of population is Delhi with a
population of 11,297 persons per square kilometre.
6.The UT with lowest density of population is
Andaman and Nicobar Islands with a
population of 46 persons per square kilometre.
7.The district with highest density of
population is North East Delhi with a population of 37346 persons per
square kilometre.
8.The UT with lowest density of population is
Lahaul and Spiti (Himachal Pradesh) with a population of 2 persons per
square kilometre.
Gender Composition
1.Out of the total population, the number of
males in India
is 62,37,34,248 and number of females is 58,64,69,174.
2.The above figures give a sex ratio of 940
females per 1000 males which is an improvement of 7 points over the 2001
sex ratio of 933.
3.India had the highest sex ratio in 1901 when it was
972 and worst in 1991 when it was 927.
4.India has poorer sex ratio when compared to its
neighbours – Pakistan (943),
Sri Lanka (1034), Nepal (1014), Myanmar
(1048) and Bangladesh (978)
while it is better than China
(926), Afghanistan (931)
and Bhutan
(897).
5.Among Indian states Kerala has the highest sex
ratio of 1084 females to 1000 males while Haryana has the lowest sex ratio
of 877.
6.Among the Union
Territories, Puducherry has the
highest sex ratio of 1038 females to 1000 males while Daman and Diu has the lowest sex ratio of 618.
Literacy
1.For the purposes of Census, a person aged 7
and above who can both read and write with understanding in any language
is treated as literate. A person who can only read but cannot write is not
literate. In the censues prior to 1991, children below five years of age
were necessarily treated as illiterates.
2.The overall literacy rate as per 2011 census
is 74.04%. The literacy rate in 2001 was 65%.
3.The literacy rate is 82.14% for males and 65.46%
for females.
4.Kerala ranks first among Indian states with a
literacy rate of 93.91% followed by Mizoram with a literacy rate of 91.58%.
5.Bihar ranks last among Indian states with a
literacy rate of 63.82%. Next is Rajasthan with a literacy rate of 67.06%.
6.Four States have achieved literacy rate of
above 85% which is the target set by the Planning Commission to be
achieved by 2011-12. They are Kerala, Mizoram, Tripura and Goa.
7.Six Union
Territories have
achieved literacy rate of above 85% which is the target set by the
Planning Commission to be achieved by 2011-12. They are Lakshdweep, Daman &
Diu, Puducherry, Chandigarh, Delhi and Andaman &
Nicobar Islands.

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